Assignment 9 – Working in the Field

Assignment 9 of the Society of Botanical Artists Distance Learning Diploma was entitled ‘Working in the Field’. For this assignment we were asked to find a location we liked, any natural habitat, and study, record and illustrate the species that were present.

I deliberated for a long time about my location of choice! Eventually I chose a spot in the village of Preston in Kent where they had the most amazing display of bluebells.

I took my Jack Russel Lily along for company which turned out to be a mistake as she was nothing but a distraction…!

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I found working in the field really difficult, but enjoyable at the same time. I missed the comfort of a desk to lean on, bugs kept landing on my page and somehow I’d accidently squish them and end up with bug sauce all over my paper…! I didn’t want to pick the flowers as it’s a nature reserve, so I was rolling around the ground at all sorts of angles to try and study each flower, and I kept dropping pencils/rubbers/rulers on the ground and spending a good while searching for them on the woodland floor! Those obstacles aside, I love being outdoors, and sometimes the endless hours of painting inside at a desk does leave me craving sunshine, fresh air and exercise!

I did as many sketches as I could of each plant I could spot, picking 5 to focus on in particular:

Bluebell
Red campion
Woodland fern
Field mouse ear
Bramble

The Drawing

After all the initial drawings in my sketchbook, I then traced images which I liked using tracing paper, and started to build up my composition. I will add photos of my sketchbook pages soon, but I still need to tidy them up from their time in the wood – (i.e. they’re a complete mess!)

You’ll see in the photos above that there is a drawing of a drying bluebell. I really wanted to paint this, as I thought it was such a beautiful specimen, but unfortunately I ran out of time and I had to leave it out of the composition.

Here is a photo of the specimen, I would love to paint this one day, perhaps larger than life, to really show the colours and delicacy of those drying petals:

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The Painting

Here are some photos of this assignment in progress. I didn’t have quite enough time to give the painting the level of detail I would have liked. As a result my image had quite a stylized feel about it, which my tutor did pick up on. For example, the bramble leaves below, I didn’t get the opportunity to paint in the finer veins, only the main veins.

In this photo below you can see the bramble and fern fully painted, and the delicate field mouse ear beginning to grow up the page, entwining with the bramble.

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I really enjoyed painting the bluebell, it’s definitely a subject I’d like to paint again. You can see the bluebell ended up with the same styleized look as the bramble and fern. I found the earthy tones in the calyxes of the red campion difficult to master!

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The final piece

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Feedback

In general the feedback on this painting was quite good, but I let myself down a lot with the sketchbook pages we were asked to submit. I submitted the pages from my work in the field, with no refinement at home, so they were definitely not to the best standard.

My tutor picked up on the fact that this piece of work was painted quite stylized, which I agree with. He thought my tone and form were good, but that the tones were quite similar throughout – for example the bramble leaves at the bottom have the same light direction as those at the top.

Here is the breakdown of my marks:

Choice of subject: 9
Line: 9
Form: 8.7
Tone: 8.7
Colour: 9
Composition: 9.5
Botanical accuracy: 9.5
Technique: 8.8
Presentation 9.5
Labelling: 8

Final mark for this assignment: 8.97/10

My final thoughts

I had this really romantic picture of what ‘working in the field’ would be like. Sat in the woodland, sketching, painting… but in reality I found being away from my home comforts really difficult. I have a lot of respect for artists who spend most of their time in the field, and it’s something I would definitely like to expose myself to more, and practice.

Also a tip for this type of work – don’t underestimate the amount of time it takes, and the value of getting really detailed and thorough drawings of the specimens.

The next assignment is almost the direct opposite in terms of a botanical artists working style – working from photographs!

Thanks for reading, I hope it was a useful read, particularly for students currently on the SBA diploma.

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7 thoughts on “Assignment 9 – Working in the Field

  1. Helen this is a delightful piece of work and such an interesting blog with well constructed thoughts and self critique. Your ideas are so individual and I find quite exciting. Many thanks for sharing all this. Looking forward to hearing more from you.

    • Hello Eileen, thank you for your comment. I’m really glad that you liked the piece, this one was the piece I struggled the most with so far. Thanks for your ongoing support, I do really appreciate it! I hope you’re well and speak to you soon xxx

  2. I really like the stylized look of your page. Though it might be borne out of necessity because you did not have much time, I think it was a really good choice that worked well with the “sketchbook page” Working in The Field assignment. You managed to convey a lot of valuable information and have a beautiful composition. The stylized leaves look intentional and interesting.

  3. Helen I am just starting work on my working in the field assignment. You have answered many questions for me. I have chosen a native reserve and beautiful native plants. I was not sure if I have to paint the whole plant or just th e flowers from 5 plants.

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